The OnePlus 7T feels more like the phones that made the company popular – while the 7 Pro was a pricey attempt to take on flagships, the 7T adds a lot the value proposition of the phone but not much to the price.

Camera selection on pure or nearly pure Android phones is spotty at best. Few phones have wide, ultra-wide and telephoto cams on the back while avoiding heavy maker skins – Xperia 1 and 5 and the OnePlus 7 Pro. The Google Pixel 3, Asus Zenfone 6 and Xiaomi Mi A3 each have their compromises (i.e. not one of them has a tele cam and the Pixel’s only ultra wide camera is on the front).

A flagship-quality screen is even harder to come by – the Mi A3 missed the mark entirely and other than the gaming-oriented Asus ROG Phone II, there’s really not much in the way of high refresh rates and HDR10 support (the Xperias have HDR screens which run at 60Hz).

Weekly poll: How good is the OnePlus 7T?
  • facebook
  • Twitter
  • pinterest
  • linkedin

There’s more too, the 7T will be the first phone to ship with Android 10 (it should beat the Pixel 4 by a week or two), OnePlus made Warp Charge even faster, the new matte finish on the back is a welcome break from glossy finishes and so on.

The OnePlus 7T checks many boxes: premium camera and OLED screen, big battery with fast charging, flagship chipset, sane pricing. OnePlus’ continued refusal to add official water resistance, wireless charging and an Always On display means that it doesn’t check all boxes, however.

That said, many of those issues aren’t unique to the 7T, especially if you restrict yourself to phones running lean Android. And even if you don’t, the phone rates so high on the value-for-money scale that it’s hard to overlook.

You can read our review for an in-depth look into the OnePlus 7T, complete with a quick camera shootout between the 7T and OnePlus 7 Pro (the camera hardware is not quite identical, more details in the review).

OnePlus 7T